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Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: do priorities for practice change and feasibility of implementation vary across high income, upper and lower-middle income countries?

Citation

Gururaj, S and Bird, M-L and Borschmann, K and Eng, JJ and Watkins, CL and Walker, MF and Solomon, JM, SRRR2 KT working group, Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: do priorities for practice change and feasibility of implementation vary across high income, upper and lower-middle income countries?, Disability and Rehabilitation Article online ahead of print. ISSN 0963-8288 (2021) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

DOI: doi:10.1080/09638288.2021.1910737

Abstract

Purpose: The context of implementation plays an important role in the delivery of optimal treatments in stroke recovery and rehabilitation. Considering that stroke systems of care vary widely across the globe, the goal of the present paper is to compare healthcare providers' priority of key areas in translating stroke research to clinical practice among High Income Countries, Upper Middle- and Lower Middle-Income Countries (HICs, UMICs, LMICs). We also aimed to compare perceptions regarding the key areas' feasibility of implementation, and formulate recommendations specific to each socioeconomic region.

Methods: Data related to recommendations for knowledge translation in stroke, from a primary survey from the second Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable were segregated based on socioeconomic region. Frequency distribution was used to compare the key areas for practice change and examine the perceived feasibility of implementation of the same across HIC, UMIC and LMICs.

Results: A total of 632 responses from healthcare providers across 28 countries were received. Interdisciplinary care and access to services were high priorities across the three groups. Transitions in Care and Intensity of Practice were high priority areas in HICs, whereas Clinical Practice Guidelines were a high priority in LMICs. Interventions specific to clinical discipline, screening and assessment were among the most feasible areas in HICs, whereas Intensity of practice and Clinical Practice Guidelines were perceived as most feasible to implement in LMICs.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:high-income countries, implementation, knowledge translation, lower-middle income countries, rehabilitation, stroke, upper-middle income countries
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Neurology and neuromuscular diseases
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Evaluation of health and support services
Objective Field:Health system performance (incl. effectiveness of programs)
UTAS Author:Bird, M-L (Dr Marie-Louise Bird)
ID Code:144269
Year Published:2021
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2021-05-05
Last Modified:2021-06-30
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