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Global drivers of recent diversification in a marine species complex

Citation

Silva, CNS and Murphy, NP and Bell, JJ and Green, BS and Duhamel, G and Cockcroft, AC and Hernandez, CE and Strugnell, JM, Global drivers of recent diversification in a marine species complex, Molecular Ecology, 30, (5) pp. 1223-1236. ISSN 0962-1083 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1111/mec.15780

Abstract

Investigating historical gene flow in species complexes can indicate how environmental and reproductive barriers shape genome divergence during speciation. The processes influencing species diversification under environmental change remain one of the central focal points of evolutionary biology, particularly for marine organisms with high dispersal potential. We investigated genome‐wide divergence, introgression patterns and inferred demographic history between species pairs of all six extant rock lobster species (Jasus spp.), which have a long larval duration of up to two years and have populated continental shelf and seamount habitats around the globe at approximately 40oS. Genetic differentiation patterns reflected geographic isolation and the environment (i.e. habitat structure). Eastern Pacific species (J. caveorum and J. frontalis) were geographically more distant and genetically more differentiated from the remaining four species. Species associated with continental shelf habitats shared a common ancestry, but are geographically distant from one another. Similarly, species associated with island/seamount habitats in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans shared a common ancestry, but are also geographically distant. Benthic temperature was the environmental variable that explained most of the genetic differentiation (FST), while controlling for the effects of geographic distance. Eastern Pacific species retained a signal of strict isolation following ancient migration, whereas species pairs from Australia and Africa, and seamounts in the Indian and Atlantic oceans, included events of introgression after secondary contact. Our results reveal important effects of habitat and demographic processes on the recent divergence of species within the genus Jasus, providing one of the first empirical studies of genome‐wide drivers of diversification that incorporates all extant species in a marine genus with long pelagic larval duration.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:demographic inference, environmental association, genomics, Jasus spp., lobsters, speciation with gene flow
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Evolutionary biology
Research Field:Evolutionary ecology
Objective Division:Environmental Management
Objective Group:Marine systems and management
Objective Field:Marine biodiversity
UTAS Author:Green, BS (Associate Professor Bridget Green)
ID Code:143193
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration
Deposited On:2021-03-04
Last Modified:2021-04-19
Downloads:0

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