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Protective immunity against secondary poxvirus infection is dependent on antibody but not on CD4 or CD8 T-cell function

Citation

Panchanathan, V and Chaudhri, G and Karupiah, G, Protective immunity against secondary poxvirus infection is dependent on antibody but not on CD4 or CD8 T-cell function, Journal of Virology, 80, (13) pp. 6333-8. ISSN 0022-538X (2006) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2006, American Society for Microbiology

DOI: doi:10.1128/JVI.00115-06

Abstract

Renewed interest in smallpox and the need for safer vaccines have highlighted our lack of understanding of the requirements for protective immunity. Since smallpox has been eradicated, surrogate animal models of closely related orthopoxviruses, such as ectromelia virus, have been used to establish critical roles for CD8 T cells in the control of primary infection. To study the requirements for protection against secondary infection, we have used a prime-challenge regime, in which avirulent ectromelia virus was used to prime mice that were then challenged with virulent ectromelia virus. In contrast to primary infection, T cells are not required for recovery from secondary infection, since gene knockout mice deficient in CD8 T-cell function and wild-type mice acutely depleted of CD4, CD8, or both subsets were fully protected. Protection correlated with effective virus control and generation of neutralizing antibody. Notably, primed mice that lacked B cells, major histocompatibility complex class II, or CD40 succumbed to secondary infection. Thus, antibody is essential, but CD4 or CD8 T cells are not required for recovery from secondary poxvirus infection.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Smallpox; vaccination; neutralising antibody; cytotoxic T lymphocytes
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Medical microbiology
Research Field:Medical virology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Prevention of human diseases and conditions
UTAS Author:Karupiah, G (Associate Professor Guna Karupiah)
ID Code:142822
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:85
Deposited By:Medicine
Deposited On:2021-02-12
Last Modified:2021-03-31
Downloads:0

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