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Effects of walnut intake on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Citation

Li, J and Jiang, B and O Santos, H and Santos, D and Singh, A and Wang, L, Effects of walnut intake on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, Phytotherapy Research pp. 1-11. ISSN 0951-418X (2020) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: 'Effects of walnut intake on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials', which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6740. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions."

DOI: doi:10.1002/ptr.6740

Abstract

The impact of walnuts on blood pressure (BP) is not a well-established fact. Although several studies have assessed the effects of walnut consumption on BP, results are conflicting. Thus, we examined the effects of walnut doses and length of supplementation on BP. Biomedical databases were searched for published trials that compared walnut-enhanced diet to control diet. Eighteen trials met eligibility criteria (n = 1,799). Overall, walnut consumption neither did alter SBP (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 0.08 mmHg; 95% CI: -0.69, 0.85) nor DBP (WMD: 0.08 CI: -0.26, 0.42). In subgroup analyses, walnut ingestion ≤40 g was statistically correlated with reduction in SBP (WMD: -0.53 mmHg, 95% CI: -0.79, -0.26) and DBP (WMD: -0.191 mmHg, 95% CI: -0.384, -0.034). Moreover, the length of intervention ≥8 weeks was linked to a significant reduction in SBP (WMD: -1.18 mmHg, 95% CI: -1.30, -1.06). Following dose-response evaluation, walnut intake significantly changed SBP (p = .015) and DBP (p = .026) through a nonlinear fashion at walnut dose up to 40 g/d. Nevertheless, these statistical results cannot be translated into clinical practice, once the changes expressed as WMD are slight taking into consideration the absolute values of BP categories. In conclusion, this meta-analysis does not support walnut consumption as a BP-lowering strategy.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:blood pressure, cardiovascular risk, diastolic blood pressure, meta-analysis, systolic blood pressure, walnut
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Cardiovascular medicine and haematology
Research Field:Cardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Clinical health not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Singh, A (Mr Ambrish Singh)
ID Code:140812
Year Published:2020
Web of Science® Times Cited:4
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2020-09-09
Last Modified:2020-10-27
Downloads:0

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