eCite Digital Repository

Association between early weight gain and later adiposity in Sri Lankan adolescents

Citation

Samaranayake, D and Lanerolle, P and Waidyatilaka, I and De Lanerolle-Dias, M and Hills, AP and Wickremasinghe, AR and Wickramasinghe, VP, Association between early weight gain and later adiposity in Sri Lankan adolescents, Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease pp. 1-10. ISSN 2040-1744 (2020) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2020 Cambridge University Press and the International Society for developmental Origins of Health and Disease

DOI: doi:10.1017/S2040174420000331

Abstract

Early growth pattern is increasingly recognized as a determinant of later obesity. This study aimed to identify the association between weight gain in early life and anthropometry, adiposity, leptin, and fasting insulin levels in adolescence. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 366 school children aged 11-13 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured. Fat mass (FM) was assessed using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Blood was drawn after a 12-h fast for insulin and leptin assay. Birth weight and weight at 6 months and at 18 months were extracted from Child Health Development Records. An increase in weight SD score (SDS) by ≥0.67 was defined as accelerated weight gain. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to predict anthropometry, adiposity, and metabolic outcomes using sex, pubertal status, accelerated weight gain as fixed factors; age, birth weight, and family income as fixed covariates, and school as a random factor. Children with accelerated weight gain between birth and 18 months had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) SDS, WC SDS, height SDS, %FM, fat mass index (FMI), fat free mass index (FFMI), and serum leptin levels in adolescence. Accelerated weight gain between 6 and 18 months was associated with higher BMI SDS, WC SDS, %FM, and FMI, but not with height SDS or FFMI. Accelerated weight gain at 0-6 months, in children with low birth weight, was associated with higher height SDS, BMI SDS, WC SDS, %FM, and FMI; in children with normal birth weight, it was associated with BMI SDS, WC SDS, height SDS, and FFMI, but not with %FM or FMI. Effects of accelerated weight gain in early life on anthropometry and adiposity in adolescence varied in different growth windows. Accelerated weight gain during 6-18 months was associated with higher FM rather than linear growth. Effects of accelerated weight gain between 0 and 6 months varied with birth weight.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:early accelerated growth, adiposity, adolescence, birth weight, insulin, leptin, obesity
Research Division:Biomedical and Clinical Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and dietetics
Research Field:Nutritional science
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public health (excl. specific population health)
Objective Field:Behaviour and health
UTAS Author:Hills, AP (Professor Andrew Hills)
ID Code:140762
Year Published:2020
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2020-09-03
Last Modified:2020-10-19
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page