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Using textual paralinguistic cues and multimodal delivery in online assessment feedback: Do faces speak louder than words?

Citation

Moffitt, RL and Grieve, R and Padgett, C, Using textual paralinguistic cues and multimodal delivery in online assessment feedback: Do faces speak louder than words?, 2019 AusPLAT - Australian Psychology Learning and Teaching Conference, 13 - 15 September 2019, Melbourne, Australia (2019) [Plenary Presentation]

Abstract

This study investigated whether the use of paralinguistic cues and multimedia in online assessment feedback influenced reactions to the marker and the feedback. Data were collected from undergraduate students (N = 297) enrolled at two Australian universities. All participants were presented with an online faux essay along with written feedback typical of the comments students would receive in higher education. The feedback was manipulated using a 2 (emoji: no, yes) 3 (medium: written-only, written plus audio, and written plus audio-visual) between-groups design. The results revealed that, for written-only feedback, the inclusion of emoji resulted in lower perceptions of marker professionalism, conscientiousness, and emotional stability. However, participants also rated the marker higher in honesty-humility when emoji were included in written-only feedback. Levels of engagement with feedback processes moderated feedback satisfaction; satisfaction was higher with the absence than presence of emoji among those less engaged, whereas satisfaction was higher with the presence versus absence of emoji among those more engaged. Findings suggest that paralinguistic emotional cues, mode of feedback delivery, and engagement with assessment processes interact to influence reactions to online feedback.

Item Details

Item Type:Plenary Presentation
Keywords:Computer-mediated communication; Evaluation methodologies; Pedagogical issues Post-secondary education; Teaching/learning strategies
Research Division:Psychology
Research Group:Applied and developmental psychology
Research Field:Educational psychology
Objective Division:Education and Training
Objective Group:Teaching and curriculum
Objective Field:Teaching and instruction technologies
UTAS Author:Grieve, R (Dr Rachel Grieve)
UTAS Author:Padgett, C (Dr Christine Padgett)
ID Code:138017
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2020-03-19
Last Modified:2020-04-01
Downloads:0

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