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Genome sequencing reveals metabolic and cellular interdependence in an amoeba-kinetoplastid symbiosis

Citation

Tanifuji, G and Cenci, U and Moog, D and Dean, S and Nakayama, T and David, V and Fiala, I and Curtis, BA and Sibbald, SJ and Onodera, NT and Colp, M and Flegontov, P and Johnson-Mackinnon, J and McPhee, M and Inagaki, Y and Hashimoto, T and Kelly, S and Gull, K and Lukes, J and Archibald, JM, Genome sequencing reveals metabolic and cellular interdependence in an amoeba-kinetoplastid symbiosis, Scientific Reports, 7 Article 11688. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2017 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1038/s41598-017-11866-x

Abstract

Endosymbiotic relationships between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells are common in nature. Endosymbioses between two eukaryotes are also known; cyanobacterium-derived plastids have spread horizontally when one eukaryote assimilated another. A unique instance of a non-photosynthetic, eukaryotic endosymbiont involves members of the genus Paramoeba, amoebozoans that infect marine animals such as farmed fish and sea urchins. Paramoeba species harbor endosymbionts belonging to the Kinetoplastea, a diverse group of flagellate protists including some that cause devastating diseases. To elucidate the nature of this eukaryote-eukaryote association, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of Paramoeba pemaquidensis and its endosymbiont Perkinsela sp. The endosymbiont nuclear genome is ~9.5 Mbp in size, the smallest of a kinetoplastid thus far discovered. Genomic analyses show that Perkinsela sp. has lost the ability to make a flagellum but retains hallmark features of kinetoplastid biology, including polycistronic transcription, trans-splicing, and a glycosome-like organelle. Mosaic biochemical pathways suggest extensive ‘cross-talk’ between the two organisms, and electron microscopy shows that the endosymbiont ingests amoeba cytoplasm, a novel form of endosymbiont-host communication. Our data reveal the cell biological and biochemical basis of the obligate relationship between Perkinsela sp. and its amoeba host, and provide a foundation for understanding pathogenicity determinants in economically important Paramoeba.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:genome sequencing, endosymbiotic relationships, Paramoeba
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Genetics
Research Field:Genomics
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences
UTAS Author:Johnson-Mackinnon, J (Ms Jessica Johnson-Mackinnon)
ID Code:121219
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:28
Deposited By:Fisheries and Aquaculture
Deposited On:2017-09-18
Last Modified:2018-02-05
Downloads:119 View Download Statistics

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