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Personality traits, self-care behaviours and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II

Citation

Skinner, TC and Bruce, DG and Davis, TME and Davis, WA, Personality traits, self-care behaviours and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II, Diabetic Medicine, 31, (4) pp. 487-492. ISSN 0742-3071 (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 The Authors. Copyright 2013 Diabetes UK.

DOI: doi:10.1111/dme.12339

Abstract

Aims: To determine whether the personality traits of conscientiousness and agreeableness are associated with self-care behaviours and glycaemia in Type 2 diabetes.

Methods: The Big Five Inventory personality traits Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Neuroticism and Openness were determined along with a range of other variables in 1313 participants with Type 2 diabetes (mean age 65.8 ± 11.1 years; 52.9% men) undertaking their baseline assessment as part of the community-based longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II. Age- and sex-adjusted generalized linear modelling was used to determine whether personality was associated with BMI, smoking, self-monitoring of blood glucose and medication taking. Multivariable regression was used to investigate which traits were independently associated with these self-care behaviours and HbA1c.

Results: Patients with higher conscientiousness were less likely to be obese or smoke, and more likely to perform self-monitoring of blood glucose and take their medications (P ≤ 0.019), with similar independent associations in multivariate models (P ≤ 0.024). HbA1c was independently associated with younger age, indigenous ethnicity, higher BMI, longer diabetes duration, diabetes treatment, self-monitoring of blood glucose (negatively) and less medication taking (P ≤ 0.009), but no personality trait added to the model.

Conclusions: Although there was no independent association between personality traits and HbA1c, the relationship between high conscientiousness and low BMI and beneficial self-care behaviours suggests an indirect positive effect on glycaemia. Conscientiousness could be augmented by the use of impulse control training as part of diabetes management.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Preventive Medicine
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Diabetes
Author:Skinner, TC (Professor Timothy Skinner)
ID Code:98276
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:10
Deposited By:Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2015-02-10
Last Modified:2015-05-12
Downloads:0

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