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Response to commentary by Woinarski (Critical-weight-range marsupials in northern Australia are declining: a commentary on Fisher et al. (2014) ‘The current decline of tropical marsupials in Australia: is history repeating?’)

Citation

Fisher, DO and Johnson, CN and Lawes, MJ and Fritz, SA and McCallum, H and Blomberg, SP and VanDerWal, J and Abbott, B and Frank, A and Legge, S and Letnic, M and Thomas, CR and Fisher, A and Gordon, IJ and Kutt, A, Response to commentary by Woinarski (Critical-weight-range marsupials in northern Australia are declining: a commentary on Fisher et al. (2014) The current decline of tropical marsupials in Australia: is history repeating?'), Global Ecology and Biogeography, 24, (1) pp. 123-125. ISSN 1466-822X (2014) [Letter or Note in Journal]


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DOI: doi:10.1111/geb.12252

Abstract

The recent commentary by Woinarski (2014, Global Ecology and Biogeography, doi: 10.1111/geb.12165) disagreed with our conclusions on the correlates of decline in the marsupials of tropical Australia (Fisher et al., 2014, Global Ecology and Biogeography, 23, 181–190). We compared traits of species that were associated with range decline in southern and northern Australia. We found that habitat structure, climate and body size were correlated with range decline. In the north, declines of marsupials were most severe in savanna with moderate rainfall. In the south, the ranges of species in open habitat with very low rainfall have declined most. Also, the association between range decline and body mass differed between north and south: this is the main concern of Woinarski, who further disagreed with our choice of the Tropic of Capricorn as a boundary between north and south, our omission of rodents, how to treat timing of extinctions, and our inference that cats are major drivers of decline. We address these concerns in this response.

Item Details

Item Type:Letter or Note in Journal
Keywords:mammal declines, threratened species, feral cats
Research Division:Environmental Sciences
Research Group:Environmental Science and Management
Research Field:Wildlife and Habitat Management
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales
Author:Johnson, CN (Professor Christopher Johnson)
Author:Frank, A (Dr Anke Frank)
ID Code:97575
Year Published:2014
Funding Support:Australian Research Council (LP100100033)
Deposited By:Zoology
Deposited On:2014-12-23
Last Modified:2015-01-30
Downloads:0

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