eCite Digital Repository

Associations between use of pharmacological aids in a smoking cessation attempt and subsequent quitting activity: a population study

Citation

Ferguson, SG and Brown, J and Frandsen, M and West, R, Associations between use of pharmacological aids in a smoking cessation attempt and subsequent quitting activity: a population study, Addiction, 110, (3) pp. 513-518. ISSN 0965-2140 (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction

DOI: doi:10.1111/add.12795

Abstract

Background and Aims: Modelling the population impact and cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation aids is limited by lack of knowledge about how the use of aids changes across quit attempts. Here we test whether the quit method used in a previous attempt influences (i) future decisions to quit and/or (ii) treatment/s used during subsequent attempts.

Design and Setting: Data came from the Smoking Toolkit Study, a United Kingdom national household survey.

Participants and Measures: Smokers (n = 5489) who completed a baseline and 6-month follow-up questionnaire. Respondents were asked what treatment/s, grouped as: prescription medication/s [bupropion, varenicline or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)], over-the-counter NRT or unaided that they had used in their most recent quit attempt (at baseline), and any use of treatment/s for a quit attempt in the last 3 months at follow-up.

Results: Smokers who had tried to quit at baseline were more likely to report having tried to quit again prior to follow-up [all odds ratios ≥  2.19 relative to no attempt at baseline, P <  0.001]. Smokers who tried to quit using pharmacological aids were more likely to try to quit again at follow-up (all ORs ≥  2.19 relative to no attempt at baseline, P  < 0.001). Smokers tended to re-try aids used in baseline attempts in future attempts (all ORs ≥  1.48 relative to no attempt at baseline, P  <  0.01).

Conclusions: Smokers who have tried to quit in the past year are more likely to try to quit again within 6 months regardless of whether they used a pharmacological aid, and they are more likely to re-try aids they had used previously.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:behavioural support, bupropion, cessation medication, modelling, nicotine replacement therapy, quitting behaviour smoking cessation, varenicline
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Substance Abuse
Author:Ferguson, SG (Associate Professor Stuart Ferguson)
Author:Frandsen, M (Dr Mai Frandsen)
ID Code:97430
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2014-12-17
Last Modified:2015-05-01
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page