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When the ink runs dry: Implications for theory and practice when educators stop keeping reflective journals

Citation

Dyment, JE and O'Connell, TS, When the ink runs dry: Implications for theory and practice when educators stop keeping reflective journals, Innovative Higher Education, 39, (5) pp. 417-429. ISSN 0742-5627 (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2014 Springer

DOI: doi:10.1007/s10755-014-9291-6

Abstract

In this article we report on a study that explored educators’ past and current use of reflective journals and if and how these practices influence their pedagogical use of such journals with their own students. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 8 educators who had kept reflective journals in the past but were no longer doing so; however, they require their own students to keep journals. Several interesting themes emerged including the temporal relevance of using reflective journals in professional practice, the significance of alternative methods of reflection, implications of the "teaching as you’ve been taught" phenomenon, and the importance of lower levels of reflection in development as a professional.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:reflection, education
Research Division:Education
Research Group:Education Systems
Research Field:Higher Education
Objective Division:Education and Training
Objective Group:Teaching and Instruction
Objective Field:Teacher and Instructor Development
Author:Dyment, JE (Dr Janet Dyment)
ID Code:97314
Year Published:2014
Deposited By:Education
Deposited On:2014-12-10
Last Modified:2017-12-14
Downloads:0

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