eCite Digital Repository

Depression symptoms in people with diabetes attending outpatient podiatry clinics for the treatment of foot ulcers

Citation

Pearson, S and Nash, T and Ireland, V, Depression symptoms in people with diabetes attending outpatient podiatry clinics for the treatment of foot ulcers, Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 7 Article 47. ISSN 1757-1146 (2014) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF
190Kb
  

Copyright Statement

Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1186/s13047-014-0047-4

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms, diabetes self-management, and quality of life in people with diabetes and foot ulcers. Ulcer status, mortality and amputations were also assessed at six months follow-up.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of people attending outpatient podiatry clinics at a major tertiary referral hospital. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Diabetes self-care was assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. Health-related quality of life was measured using the physical component summary score (PCS) and the mental component summary score (MCS) of the SF-12.

Results: Of the 60 participants in the study 14 (23.3%) reported mild symptoms of depression (PHQ score 5-9) and 17 (28.3%) moderate to severe depressive symptoms (PHQ score > 9). Twenty-one (35%) met the criteria for previously recognized depression (on antidepressants and/or a diagnosis of depression in the last 12 months) and 17 (28.3%) for depression not previously recognized (PHQ > 4). Seventeen (28%) participants had been receiving antidepressant treatment for a median duration of 104 weeks (IQR 20, 494 weeks). Despite antidepressant treatment 12 participants (70.6% of those taking antidepressants) still reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms at the time of the study. Patients with PHQ scores > 4 reported poorer adherence to diabetes self-care activities including general diet, exercise, blood sugar monitoring and foot care when compared to those participants with PHQ scores < 5. No association was found between physical functioning (PCS) and depressive symptoms. Decreasing mental wellbeing (MCS) was associated with increasing depressive symptoms. At six months follow-up, there were three deaths and three amputations in participants with PHQ scores > 4 compared with no deaths and 2 amputations in participants with PHQ scores < 5. There was no association between depressive symptoms and ulcer healing or ulcer recurrence at the six-month follow-up.

Conclusions: This study found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms both recognized and unrecognized in people with diabetes and foot ulcers. Depressive symptoms were associated with overall poorer diabetes self-management and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There was no association between depressive symptoms and ulcer outcomes at six-months follow-up.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:diabetes self-management, depressive symptoms, foot ulcers, PHQ-9, Antidepressants, quality of life
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Nursing
Research Field:Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Health and Support Services
Objective Field:Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
Author:Pearson, S (Dr Sue Pearson)
ID Code:97289
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:Medicine (Discipline)
Deposited On:2014-12-10
Last Modified:2017-11-03
Downloads:201 View Download Statistics

Repository Staff Only: item control page