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The Bristol regional pelvic and acetabular fracture service: Workload implications of managing the polytraumatised patient

Citation

Harvie, P and Chesser, TJS and Ward, AJ, The Bristol regional pelvic and acetabular fracture service: Workload implications of managing the polytraumatised patient, Injury: British Journal of Accident Surgery, 39, (8) pp. 839-843. ISSN 0020-1383 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.injury.2008.01.001

Abstract

Pelvic and acetabular injury may occur in isolation, or, in two-thirds of cases be associated with other significant injuries to the skeleton or other body systems. Most unstable pelvic and acetabular injuries require specialist surgical treatment which often means transfer to a specialist centre. The associated injuries also require assessment and treatment by appropriate specialists. It is believed patients treated in specialist centres for these injuries have an improved outcome. Costing implications therefore exist for hospitals purchasing such services from specialist pelvic units. This paper presents a review of the multidisciplinary specialty surgical workload generated by offering a regional pelvic and acetabular service in Bristol over a 1-year period. It suggests previous reports documenting the number of patients suffering pelvic and acetabular injuries associated with other significant injuries, may have been underestimated. This information informs health care purchasers of the real extent of the surgical and other services needed and the resources required to treat patients with unstable pelvic and acetabular injuries.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Acetabular fracture; Centre; Funding; Pelvic; Polytrauma; Regional
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Orthopaedics
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
Author:Harvie, P (Dr Paul Harvie)
ID Code:95336
Year Published:2008
Web of Science® Times Cited:11
Deposited By:Medicine (Discipline)
Deposited On:2014-09-30
Last Modified:2014-09-30
Downloads:0

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