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British anthropological thought in colonial practice: The appropriation of Indigenous Australian bodies, 1860-1880

Citation

Turnbull, PG, British anthropological thought in colonial practice: The appropriation of Indigenous Australian bodies, 1860-1880, Foreign bodies: Oceania and the science of race 1750-1940, ANU E Press, Bronwen Douglas and Chris Ballard (ed), Canberra, Australia, pp. 109-130. ISBN 9781921313998 (2008) [Research Book Chapter]

Abstract

Within Australian historiography, the procurement of indigenous Australian ancestral remains by European scientists has generally been explained as resulting from the desire to produce evidence refining the core assumptions of Darwinian theory. I have argued elsewhere (1998, 1999) that the procurement of anatomical specimens through desecration of indigenous burial places in fact began shortly after the establishment of the penal settlement of New South Wales in 1788. It also seems clear that from the early 1880s indigenous burial places were plundered with a view to producing knowledge that would answer various questions about the origins and nature of racial difference that emerged as a consequence of the rapid and widespread assent given Darwinian evolutionary theory (Turnbull 1991).

Item Details

Item Type:Research Book Chapter
Research Division:Philosophy and Religious Studies
Research Group:History and Philosophy of Specific Fields
Research Field:History and Philosophy of Science (incl. Non-historical Philosophy of Science)
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
Author:Turnbull, PG (Professor Paul Turnbull)
ID Code:92902
Year Published:2008
Deposited By:Humanities
Deposited On:2014-06-30
Last Modified:2014-09-12
Downloads:0

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