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Predicting intentions to fake in psychological testing: which normative beliefs are important?

Citation

Grieve, R and McSwiggan, C, Predicting intentions to fake in psychological testing: which normative beliefs are important?, Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 30, (1) pp. 23-28. ISSN 1576-5962 (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2014 Colegio Oficial de Psicólogos de Madrid. Todos los derechos reservados

Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...

DOI: doi:10.5093/tr2014a3

Abstract

While previous research has examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in relation to intentions to fake in psychological testing, the current research extended the TPB model to empirically assess the role of moral norms and ethics. A hierarchical multiple regression was conducted (N = 225). In step 1, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm significantly predicted intention to fake, although only attitude and perceived behavioral control were significant individual predictors, with 52.3% of variance explained. In step 2, addition of moral obligation norms significantly improved predicted intention to fake and explained an additional 14% of variance. In step 3, ethical position explained no additional variance. Future research should consider specific applicant faking scenarios or a behavioral outcome measure. It is concluded that personal, moral norms, rather than other-centred norms, are valuable when predicting faking intentions, and that integration of existing theoretical models of faking is indicated.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:theory of planned behaviour, employment selection, faking, intention, moral norm
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Social and Community Psychology
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Grieve, R (Dr Rachel Grieve)
ID Code:89736
Year Published:2014
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2014-03-13
Last Modified:2015-05-01
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