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Foraging parameters influencing the detection and interpretation of area-restricted search behaviour in marine predators: a case study with the masked booby

Citation

Sommerfeld, Julia and Kato, A and Ropert-Coudert, Y and Garthe, S and Hindell, MA, Foraging parameters influencing the detection and interpretation of area-restricted search behaviour in marine predators: a case study with the masked booby, PLoS ONE, 8, (5) Article e63742. ISSN 1932-6203 (2013) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 Sommerfeld et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063742

Abstract

Identification of Area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour is used to better understand foraging movements and strategies of marine predators. Track-based descriptive analyses are commonly used to detect ARS behaviour, but they may be biased by factors such as foraging trip duration or non-foraging behaviours (i.e. resting on the water). Using first-passage time analysis we tested if (I) daylight resting at the sea surface positions falsely increase the detection of ARS behaviour and (II) short foraging trips are less likely to include ARS behaviour in Masked Boobies Sula dactylatra. We further analysed whether ARS behaviour may be used as a proxy to identify important feeding areas. Depth-acceleration and GPS-loggers were simultaneously deployed on chick-rearing adults to obtain (1) location data every 4 minutes and (2) detailed foraging activity such as diving rates, time spent sitting on the water surface and in flight. In 82% of 50 foraging trips, birds adopted ARS behaviour. In 19.3% of 57 detected ARS zones, birds spent more than 70% of total ARS duration resting on the water, suggesting that these ARS zones were falsely detected. Based on generalized linear mixed models, the probability of detecting false ARS zones was 80%. False ARS zones mostly occurred during short trips in close proximity to the colony, with low or no diving activity. This demonstrates the need to account for resting on the water surface positions in marine animals when determining ARS behaviour based on foraging locations. Dive rates were positively correlated with trip duration and the probability of ARS behaviour increased with increasing number of dives, suggesting that the adoption of ARS behaviour in Masked Boobies is linked to enhanced foraging activity. We conclude that ARS behaviour may be used as a proxy to identify important feeding areas in this species. © 2013 Sommerfeld et al.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:foraging behaviour, seabirds
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Ecosystem Assessment and Management
Objective Field:Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments
Author:Sommerfeld, Julia (Ms Julia Sommerfeld)
Author:Hindell, MA (Professor Mark Hindell)
ID Code:89058
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:11
Deposited By:IMAS Research and Education Centre
Deposited On:2014-02-24
Last Modified:2017-11-01
Downloads:458 View Download Statistics

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