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The longitudinal relationship between changes in body weight and changes in medial tibial cartilage, and pain among community-based adults with and without meniscal tears

Citation

Teichtahl, AJ and Wluka, AE and Wang, Y and Strauss, BJ and Proietto, J and Dixon, JB and Jones, G and Forbes, A and Kouloyan-Ilic, S and Martel-Pelletier, J and Pelletier, J-P and Cicuttini, FM, The longitudinal relationship between changes in body weight and changes in medial tibial cartilage, and pain among community-based adults with and without meniscal tears, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: The Eular Journal, 73, (June) pp. 1652-1658. ISSN 0003-4967 (2014) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 The Authors

DOI: doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203210

Abstract

Introduction: Meniscal tears are commonly found on MRI and increase the risk for radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). While meniscectomy is recommended when knee pain is severe or functionally disabling, it is unclear how to best treat meniscal tears without these symptoms. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine the effect of weight change on knee cartilage and pain in a cohort of community-based adults with and without meniscal tears detected by MRI. Methods: 250 adults with no history of knee OA or knee injury were recruited from the general community and weight-loss clinics. MRI of the knee, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), weight and height were measured at baseline and again at follow-up approximately 2 years later. Results: Medial meniscal tears were present in 36 (18%) of the cohort. In those with medial meniscal tears, after adjustment for confounders, percentage weight change was significantly associated with percentage change in medial tibial cartilage volume (β 0.2% 95% CI 0.08% to 0.3% p=0.002) and knee pain (β 11.6% 95% CI 2.1% to 21.1% p=0.02). That is, for every 1% gain in weight, there was an associated 0.2% increased loss of medial tibial cartilage volume and 11.6% increase in pain. In those with no medial meniscal tear, neither change in medial tibial cartilage volume (β 0.02% 95% CI -0.01% to 0.10% p=0.53) or pain (β 1.9% 95% CI -2.2% to 6.1% p=0.36) were significantly associated with change in weight. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that among adults with medial meniscal tears, weight gain is associated with increased cartilage loss and pain, while weight loss is associated with the converse. This suggests attention to weight is particularly important in the management of people with medial meniscal tears. © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Rheumatology and Arthritis
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
Author:Jones, G (Professor Graeme Jones)
ID Code:88068
Year Published:2014 (online first 2013)
Web of Science® Times Cited:9
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2014-01-09
Last Modified:2017-11-02
Downloads:0

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