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Differential activity of plasma and vacuolar membrane transporters contributes to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in a halophyte species, Chenopodium quinoa

Citation

Bonales-Alatorre, E and Pottosin, I and Shabala, L and Chen, Z-H and Zeng, F and Jacobsen, S-E and Shabala, S, Differential activity of plasma and vacuolar membrane transporters contributes to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in a halophyte species, Chenopodium quinoa, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 14, (5) pp. 9267-9285. ISSN 1422-0067 (2013) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

DOI: doi:10.3390/ijms14059267

Abstract

Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow (SV) and fast (FV) tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013) Plant Physiology). This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa. These include: (i) a higher rate of Na+ exclusion from leaf mesophyll; (ii) maintenance of low cytosolic Na+ levels; (iii) better K+ retention in the leaf mesophyll; (iv) a high rate of H+ pumping, which increases the ability of mesophyll cells to restore their membrane potential; and (v) the ability to reduce the activity of SV and FV channels under saline conditions. These mechanisms appear to be highly orchestrated, thus enabling the remarkable overall salinity tolerance of quinoa species.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sodium exclusion, vacuolar sequestration, potassium retention, mesophyll, cytosol, H+-ATPase, SOS1 exchanger
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Plant Biology
Research Field:Plant Physiology
Objective Division:Plant Production and Plant Primary Products
Objective Group:Summer Grains and Oilseeds
Objective Field:Summer Grains and Oilseeds not elsewhere classified
Author:Bonales-Alatorre, E (Dr Edgar Bonales Alatorre)
Author:Pottosin, I (Professor Igor Pottosin)
Author:Shabala, L (Dr Lana Shabala)
Author:Chen, Z-H (Mr Zhonghua Chen)
Author:Zeng, F (Dr Fanrong Zeng)
Author:Shabala, S (Professor Sergey Shabala)
ID Code:86932
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:40
Deposited By:Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Deposited On:2013-11-01
Last Modified:2017-11-03
Downloads:416 View Download Statistics

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