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Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells

Citation

Osmond-McLeod, MJ and McLeod, RIW and Oytam, Y and McCall, MJ and Feltis, B and Mackay-Sim, A and Wood, SA and Cook, AL, Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells, Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 10, (54) pp. 1-18. ISSN 1743-8977 (2013) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 Osmond-McLeod et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

DOI: doi:10.1186/1743-8977-10-54

Abstract

Background Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported in some instances to translocate from the nostril to the olfactory bulb in exposed rats. In close proximity to the olfactory bulb is the olfactory mucosa, within which resides a niche of multipotent cells. Cells isolated from this area may provide a relevant in vitro system to investigate potential effects of workplace exposure to inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles. Methods Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa. Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (hONS) cells from healthy adult donors were analyzed for modulation of cytokine levels, activation of intracellular signalling pathways, changes in gene-expression patterns across the whole genome, and compromised cellular function over a 24 h period following exposure to the nanoparticles suspended in cell culture medium. Results ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA. Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees. Conclusions The results indicate that care should be taken in the workplace to minimize generation of, and exposure to, aerosols of uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, given the adverse responses reported here using multipotent cells derived from the olfactory mucosa.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Zinc oxide; Nanoparticle; Olfactory; Gene expression; Cell-signalling; DNA-damage
Research Division:Technology
Research Group:Nanotechnology
Research Field:Nanotoxicology, Health and Safety
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Other Health
Objective Field:Health not elsewhere classified
Author:Cook, AL (Dr Tony Cook)
ID Code:86916
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:17
Deposited By:Health Sciences A
Deposited On:2013-10-31
Last Modified:2014-06-17
Downloads:214 View Download Statistics

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