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The dental health of Australia's children by remoteness

Citation

Ha, DH and Amarasena, N and Crocombe, LA, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, The dental health of Australia's children by remoteness, Canberra: AIHW, DEN 225 (2009) [Consultants Report]


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Abstract

Summary

This publication describes the state of dental health of Australian children examined by school dental service staff in 2009 and provides insights into the dental health of rural children. The findings are drawn from the Child Dental Health Survey 2009, in which the data of 87,269 children aged 5-14 from most states and territories, except New South Wales and Victoria, were collected and analysed. Any comparisons with previous years or international statistics should be made with caution due to missing data from New South Wales and Victoria.

Dental decay is relatively common among Australian children

Just over half (51%) of children aged 6 attending a school dental service had a history of decay in their deciduous ('baby') teeth-that is, 1 or more decayed, missing or filled deciduous teeth (dmft). On average, children aged 6 had 2 or more dmft each (mean dmft = 2.36). Among children aged 12, nearly half (45.0%) had experienced decay in their permanent teeth, with 1 or more decayed, missing or filled permanent teeth (DMFT). On average, children aged 12 had just over 1 affected tooth (mean DMFT = 1.05).

A minority of children experience a greater amount of dental decay

The one-tenth of children aged 6 with the most extensive history of deciduous tooth decay had almost 10 deciduous teeth affected-more than 4 times the average for children of that age. The one-tenth of children aged 12 with the most extensive history of permanent tooth decay had 4.83 permanent teeth affected-about 4 times the average for children of that age.

Dental decay varies across the regions

Children who lived in Remote/Very remote areas were at increased risk of dental decay compared with those who lived in Major cities. The mean number of dmft at age 6 and the mean DMFT at age 12 were higher among children in Remote/Very remote areas than among those in Major cities.

Conclusions

Dental decay was relatively common among Australian children who attended a school dental service.

A minority of children still experience a much greater amount of dental decay than average burden of disease.

Children in Regional and Remote areas were at increased risk of dental decay in their deciduous teeth compared with those in Major cities.

Item Details

Item Type:Consultants Report
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Dentistry
Research Field:Dentistry not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Dental Health
Author:Crocombe, LA (Associate Professor Leonard Crocombe)
ID Code:86161
Year Published:2009
Deposited By:Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2013-08-28
Last Modified:2013-08-28
Downloads:0

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