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Functional and neural mechanisms of embodiment: the importance of the vestibular system and the temporal parietal junction

Citation

Lenggenhager, B and Smith, ST and Blanke, O, Functional and neural mechanisms of embodiment: the importance of the vestibular system and the temporal parietal junction, Reviews in the Neurosciences, 17, (6) pp. 643-657. ISSN 0334-1763 (2007) [Review Several Works]

DOI: doi:10.1515/REVNEURO.2006.17.6.643

Abstract

Embodiment, the sense of being localized within one's physical body, is a fundamental aspect of the self. Recent research shows that self and body processing as well as embodiment require distinct brain mechanisms. Here, we review recent clinical and neuroimaging research on multisensory perception and integration as well as mental imagery, pointing out their importance for the coding of embodiment at the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). Special reference is given to vestibular mechanisms that are relevant for self and embodiment and to methods that interfere experimentally with normal embodiment. We conclude that multisensory and vestibular coding at the TPJ mediates humans' experience as being embodied and spatially situated, and argue that pathologies concerning the disembodied self, such as out-of-body experience or other autoscopic phenomena, are due to deficient multisensory integration at the TPJ.

Item Details

Item Type:Review Several Works
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Sensory Systems
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
Author:Smith, ST (Associate Professor Stuart Smith)
ID Code:85435
Year Published:2007
Web of Science® Times Cited:32
Deposited By:Health Sciences A
Deposited On:2013-07-05
Last Modified:2013-07-05
Downloads:0

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