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Cyberfaking: I can, so I will? Intentions to fake in online psychological testing

Citation

Grieve, RM and Elliott, J, Cyberfaking: I can, so I will? Intentions to fake in online psychological testing, Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 16, (5) pp. 364-369. ISSN 2152-2715 (2013) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

This is a copy of an article published in the [Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking] Journal © [2013] [copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.]; [Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking] is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com.

DOI: doi:10.1089/cyber.2012.0271

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether intentions to fake online (cyberfaking) or in pencil-and-paper psychological testing differ. Participants (N = 154) completed online questionnaires measuring attitudes toward faking, perceived behavioral control over faking, subjective norms regarding faking, and intentions to fake in future psychological assessment, with online and pencil-and-paper test administration scenarios compared. Participants showed similar intentions toward cyberfaking and faking in pencil-and-paper testing. However, participants held more positive attitudes toward cyberfaking than faking offline, greater perceived behavioral control over cyberfaking than offline faking, and more favorable subjective norms toward cyberfaking compared to offline faking. Analysis via multiple regression revealed that more positive attitudes toward cyberfaking, greater perceived behavioral control over cyberfaking, and more favorable subjective norms regarding cyberfaking were significantly related to the intention to cyberfake. In addition, more positive attitudes toward faking offline and greater perceived behavioral control over faking offline were significantly related to the intention to fake in offline tests. Overall, results indicated a similar pattern of relationship in the prediction of intentions to engage in faking regardless of the test administration modality scenario. Subjective norm, however, was not a significant predictor for faking offline. Future research could aim to include a behavioral faking outcome measure, as well as examine intentions to cyberfake in specific scenarios (for example, faking good or faking bad).

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:online assessment, internet testing, faking, malingering, psychological testing, equivalence
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Personality, Abilities and Assessment
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Grieve, RM (Dr Rachel Grieve)
ID Code:85194
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2013-06-18
Last Modified:2017-11-13
Downloads:0

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