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Volatile organoselenium monitoring in production and gastric digestion processes of selenized yeast by Solid Phase microextraction - multicapillary gas chromatography coupled microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry

Citation

Sanz Landaluze, J and Dietz, C and Madrid, Y and Camara, C, Volatile organoselenium monitoring in production and gastric digestion processes of selenized yeast by Solid Phase microextraction - multicapillary gas chromatography coupled microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry, Applied Organometallic Chemistry, 18, (12) pp. 606-613. ISSN 0268-2605 (2004) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1002/aoc.626

Abstract

Evolution of volatile organoselenium compounds in the production and gastric digestion of selenized yeast has been monitored. The industrial production of these kinds of material, employed as food supplements, has been simulated in a process of yeast enrichment with inorganic selenium selenium (IV) in different growth media, with variation of the pH value. The in vitro gastric digestion process was carried out with pepsin in an acid and salt mixture. Determination of volatile species of selenium was achieved coupling solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for preconcentration and sample–matrix separation and microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry, in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography for separation and detection of the selenium species. The MC column was operated at low temperatures (∼30 ◦C). The method was optimized, using a chemometric approach, with respect to the detection of organoselenium species such as dimethylselenide, diethylselenide and dimethyldiselenide. SPME sampling was carried out in the headspace above the corresponding solutions. Separation is fast, with a chromatogram being obtained in less than 5 min, and the detection limits were at the low parts per billion level for all species investigated. The results of the yeast enrichment process demonstrate inorganic selenium transformation into volatile organic species. The presence of inorganic selenium gave rise to at least five different volatile species after metabolization by yeast, with dimethylselenide and dimethyldiselenide being the predominant species. Commercial pasteurized yeast, containing mainly selenomethionine for use as a food supplement, and tablets were found to be still active under conditions of the simulation of the digestion process, even though producing relatively low amounts of organoselenium compounds.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:yeast production, digestion, solid-phase microextraction, MIP-detection, organoselenium compounds, multicapillary column
Research Division:Chemical Sciences
Research Group:Analytical Chemistry
Research Field:Analytical Chemistry not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Plant Production and Plant Primary Products
Objective Group:Other Plant Production and Plant Primary Products
Objective Field:Plant Production and Plant Primary Products not elsewhere classified
Author:Dietz, C (Dr Christian Dietz)
ID Code:84829
Year Published:2004
Web of Science® Times Cited:12
Deposited By:Central Science Laboratory
Deposited On:2013-06-03
Last Modified:2013-11-29
Downloads:0

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