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Slow and steady is not as easy as it sounds: interlimb coordination at slow speed is associated with elevated attentional demand especially in older adults

Citation

Fujiyama, H and Hinder, MR and Garry, MI and Summers, JJ, Slow and steady is not as easy as it sounds: interlimb coordination at slow speed is associated with elevated attentional demand especially in older adults, Experimental Brain Research, 227, (2) pp. 289-300. ISSN 0014-4819 (2013) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 Springer-Verlag

DOI: doi:10.1007/s00221-013-3511-7

Abstract

The present study investigated age-related changes in the attentional demands associated with interlimb coordination involving upper and lower limbs performed at three different movement frequencies. Younger and older adults performed rhythmical, 180 out-of-phase flexion-extension movements of the knee and elbow with either ipsilateral (right arm, right leg) or contralateral (right arm, left leg) limbs at 20, 60, and 100 % of each individual's maximum movement frequency. A concurrent vocal reaction time task (dual task) was used to assess attentional load. There were two major findings: (1) The attentional cost associated with undertaking the required coordination patterns was greatest at the slowest movement frequency, and this additional attentional load was most pronounced for older adults; (2) the manipulation of movement frequency had a distinct effect on the coordination performance: moving at the fastest frequency degraded the accuracy and stability of coordination, while moving at the slowest movement frequency led to increased temporal variability, particularly in older adults. Coordination performance at slowest movement frequency required the greatest cognitive demand in older adults relative to other movement frequencies, suggesting that going 'slow and steady' is not necessarily less attentionally demanding for older adults.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Fujiyama, H (Dr Hakuei Fujiyama)
Author:Hinder, MR (Dr Mark Hinder)
Author:Garry, MI (Dr Michael Garry)
Author:Summers, JJ (Professor Jeffery Summers)
ID Code:84403
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:6
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2013-05-13
Last Modified:2014-12-18
Downloads:0

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