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Fire and vegetation change during the Early Pleistocene in southeastern Australia

Citation

Sniderman, JMK and Haberle, SG, Fire and vegetation change during the Early Pleistocene in southeastern Australia, Journal of Quaternary Science, 27, (3) pp. 307-317. ISSN 0267-8179 (2012) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1002/jqs.1547

Abstract

Early Pleistocene vegetation in upland southeastern Australia included diverse rainforests and sclerophyll forests, which alternated on precessional timescales. The nature and timing of transitions between these biomes, and the role of fire in maintaining or driving transitions between them, are uncertain. Here we present a high-resolution pollen record from Stony Creek Basin, a small Early Pleistocene palaeolake in southeastern Australia. The pollen record documents a pattern of vegetation change, over ca. 10ka at ca. 1590-1600ka, between sclerophyll forests, dominated by Eucalyptus, Callitris (Cupressaceae) or Casuarinaceae, and rainforests dominated by either angiosperms or conifers of the family Podocarpaceae. Transitions between these biomes typically occurred within ca. 1-2ka. The associated charcoal record suggests that greatest biomass combustion occurred when local vegetation was dominated by Eucalyptus, and the least biomass combustion occurred when local vegetation was dominated by Podocarpaceae. However, local fires burnt in both sclerophyll and angiosperm-dominated rainforest vegetation, at least once every several centuries. Fire was very rare (less than about one fire per millennium) only when the local vegetation was rainforest dominated by Podocarpaceae. This suggests that fire was an irregular presence in both sclerophyll- and angiosperm-dominated rainforest biomes during the late Neogene, though was largely absent in Podocarpaceae-dominated rainforests. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pollen; sclerophyll; Early Pleistocene; fire; rainforest
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Palaeoecology
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
Author:Sniderman, JMK (Dr Kale Sniderman)
ID Code:83521
Year Published:2012
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Plant Science
Deposited On:2013-03-15
Last Modified:2013-05-15
Downloads:0

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