eCite Digital Repository

Mechanisms for Eliminating Monoterpenes of Sagebrush by Specialist and Generalist Rabbits

Citation

Shipley, LA and Davis, EM and Felicetti, LA and McLean, S and Sorensen Foreby, J, Mechanisms for Eliminating Monoterpenes of Sagebrush by Specialist and Generalist Rabbits, Journal of Chemical Ecology, 38, (9) pp. 1178-1189. ISSN 0098-0331 (2012) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York

DOI: doi:10.1007/s10886-012-0192-9

Abstract

Abstract Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) are one of only three vertebrates that subsist virtually exclusively on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), which contains high levels of monoterpenes that can be toxic. We examined the mechanisms used by specialist pygmy rabbits to eliminate 1,8-cineole, a monoterpene of sagebrush, and compared them with those of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus nuttalli), a generalist herbivore. Rabbits were offered food pellets with increasing concentrations of cineole, and we measured voluntary intake and excretion of cineole metabolites in feces and urine. We expected pygmy rabbits to consume more, but excrete cineole more rapidly by using less-energetically expensive methods of detoxification than cottontails. Pygmy rabbits consumed 35 times more cineole than cottontails relative to their metabolic body mass, and excreted up to 2 times more cineole metabolites in their urine than did cottontails. Urinary metabolites excreted by pygmy rabbits were 20 % more highly-oxidized and 6 times less-conjugated than those of cottontails. Twenty percent of all cineole metabolites recovered from pygmy rabbits were in feces, whereas cottontails did not excrete fecal metabolites. When compared to other mammals that consume cineole, pygmy rabbits voluntarily consumed more, and excreted more cineole metabolites in feces, but they excreted less oxidized and more conjugated cineole metabolites in urine. Pygmy rabbits seem to have a greater capacity to minimize systemic exposure to cineole than do cottontails, and other cineole-consumers, by minimizing absorption and maximizing detoxification of ingested cineole. However, mechanisms that lower systemic exposure to cineole may come with a higher energetic cost in pygmy rabbits than in other mammalian herbivores.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Artemisia tridentata . Brachylagus idahoensis .
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Terrestrial Ecology
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of environments not elsewhere classified
Author:McLean, S (Professor Stuart McLean)
ID Code:83442
Year Published:2012
Web of Science® Times Cited:9
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2013-03-14
Last Modified:2013-06-27
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page