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Dietary vitamin D alters the response of the skin to UVB-irradiation depending on the genetic background of the mice

Citation

Malley, RC and Muller, HK and Norval, M and Woods, GM, Dietary vitamin D alters the response of the skin to UVB-irradiation depending on the genetic background of the mice, Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, 12 pp. 536-545. ISSN 1474-9092 (2013) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies

DOI: doi:10.1039/c2pp25211b

Abstract

Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of the skin has the benefit of causing the local production of previtamin D3 but also results in cutaneous DNA damage and suppression of the skin immune system (SIS). Strains of mice differ in their ability to be suppressed by UVB irradiation: BALB/c mice are considered "resistant" and C57BL/6 "sensitive". This study evaluated whether vitamin D-replete (D+) and deficient (D-) BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice differed in their cutaneous response to UVB irradiation. Immunosuppression was assessed by measuring the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response, DNA damage and repair determined by counting thymine dimer positive keratinocyte nuclei, and cutaneous inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia evaluated by light microscopy. The suppression in the CHS response induced by the UVB irradiation was reduced in the D+ C57BL/6 mice compared with the D- C57BL/6 mice. Similarly there was a reduction in DNA damage and promotion of its repair in the D+ C57BL/6 mice compared with the D- C57BL/6 mice. A reduction in inflammation in female D+ C57BL/6 mice compared with D- C57BL/6 females also occurred. In contrast, the suppression in the CHS response, DNA damage and its repair, and inflammation induced by UVB irradiation were similar in the D+ and D- BALB/c mice. These results indicate that dietary vitamin D3 can reduce UVB-induced suppression of the CHS response depending on the genetic background of the mice, an effect that may relate to the reduction in DNA damage and an increase in its rate of repair.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Immunology
Research Field:Cellular Immunology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Cancer and Related Disorders
Author:Malley, RC (Dr Roslyn Malley)
Author:Muller, HK (Professor Konrad Muller)
Author:Woods, GM (Professor Gregory Woods)
ID Code:82695
Year Published:2013 (online first 2012)
Web of Science® Times Cited:5
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2013-02-13
Last Modified:2017-01-18
Downloads:0

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