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A Millennial Proxy Record of ENSO and Eastern Australian Rainfall from the Law Dome Ice Core, East Antarctica

Citation

Vance, TR and van Ommen, TD and Curran, MAJ and Plummer, CT and Moy, AD, A Millennial Proxy Record of ENSO and Eastern Australian Rainfall from the Law Dome Ice Core, East Antarctica, Journal of Climate, 26, (3) pp. 710-725. ISSN 0894-8755 (2013) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2013 American Meteorological Society

DOI: doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00003.1

Abstract

ENSO causes climate extremes across and beyond the Pacific basin; however, evidence of ENSO at high southern latitudes is generally restricted to the South Pacific and West Antarctica. Here, the authors report a statistically significant link between ENSO and sea salt deposition during summer from the Law Dome (LD) ice core in East Antarctica. ENSO-related atmospheric anomalies from the central-western equatorial Pacific (CWEP) propagate to the South Pacific and the circumpolar high latitudes. These anomalies modulate high-latitude zonal winds, with El Niño (La Niña) conditions causing reduced (enhanced) zonal wind speeds and subsequent reduced (enhanced) summer sea salt deposition at LD. Over the last 1010 yr, the LD summer sea salt (LDSSS) record has exhibited two below-average (El Niño–like) epochs, 1000–1260 ad and 1920–2009 ad, and a longer above-average (La Niña–like) epoch from 1260 to 1860 ad. Spectral analysis shows the below-average epochs are associated with enhanced ENSO-like variability around 2–5 yr, while the above-average epoch is associated more with variability around 6–7 yr. The LDSSS record is also significantly correlated with annual rainfall in eastern mainland Australia. While the correlation displays decadal-scale variability similar to changes in the interdecadal Pacific oscillation (IPO), the LDSSS record suggests rainfall in the modern instrumental era (1910–2009 ad) is below the long-term average. In addition, recent rainfall declines in some regions of eastern and southeastern Australia appear to be mirrored by a downward trend in the LDSSS record, suggesting current rainfall regimes are unusual though not unknown over the last millennium.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:East Australian rainfall, Law Dome ice core
Research Division:Earth Sciences
Research Group:Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
Research Field:Glaciology
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Climate and Climate Change
Objective Field:Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts)
Author:Vance, TR (Dr Tessa Vance)
Author:van Ommen, TD (Dr Tas van Ommen)
Author:Curran, MAJ (Dr Mark Curran)
Author:Plummer, CT (Mr Christopher Plummer)
Author:Moy, AD (Dr Andrew Moy)
ID Code:81621
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:37
Deposited By:CRC-Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems
Deposited On:2012-12-19
Last Modified:2014-05-09
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