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The Priory of Hampole and its literary culture: English religious women and books in the age of Richard Rolle

Citation

Freeman, E, The Priory of Hampole and its literary culture: English religious women and books in the age of Richard Rolle, Parergon, 29, (1) pp. 1-25. ISSN 1832-8334 (2012) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2012 The Author

Official URL: http://www.parergon.arts.uwa.edu.au/

Abstract

The Cistercian priory of Hampole is known for the links that it had to the English hermit and mystic writer Richard Rolle (d. 1349). Medieval manuscripts regularly refer to Rolle as a hermit ‘of Hampole’. But what exactly were the links between the nunnery and Rolle? A small number of manuscripts suggest that Rolle wrote for a nun or nuns of Hampole, although this evidence seems destined to remain ambiguous. On the other hand, in the late fourteenth century and into the fifteenth century, we find references to Hampole nunnery as a place both familiar with Rolle’s writings and, also, as a repository of his writings. By the fifteenth century, a growing textual culture can be identified at Hampole, one that can teach us not only about Rolle’s writings and their popularity but also about the book collections of nuns and the role of nunneries as promoters of cults and protectors of religious orthodoxy.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:History and Archaeology
Research Group:Historical Studies
Research Field:British History
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
Author:Freeman, E (Dr Elizabeth Freeman)
ID Code:79733
Year Published:2012
Deposited By:History and Classics
Deposited On:2012-10-01
Last Modified:2014-12-12
Downloads:2 View Download Statistics

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