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Sources of self-efficacy for physical activity in older adults with multiple chronic conditions

Citation

Knittle, KP and Warner, LM and Ziegelmann, JP and Schuez, BEC and Wurm, S, Sources of self-efficacy for physical activity in older adults with multiple chronic conditions, Psychology & Health, 1 - 4 Setember 2010, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, pp. 255. ISSN 0887-0446 (2010) [Conference Extract]

Abstract

Objectives: To examine whether the four sources of self-efficacy (SE) deducted from Bandura’s self-efficacy theory can predict SE for physical activity (PA) in older adults with multiple chronic conditions, and furthermore, to test whether SE mediates the relationship between these sources and subsequent PA.

Methods: A sample of 309 older adults with multiple chronic conditions was assessed within the project PREFER at 3 time points for self-reported PA (T3), SE (T2), and the four sources of SE (T1): (a) past PA experience; (b) modelling (friends/ family); (c) persuasion (friends/family); (d) somatic and emotional states – positive affect (PANAS), subjective health, and objective health (peak expiratory flow). Results: After controlling for age and gender, past experience, modelling, and subjective health had significant indirect effects via SE on PA (p < 0.05). Objective health had a direct non-mediated effect on PA (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: In accordance with SE theory, past PA and modelling are the strongest predictors of SE for PA in older adults with multiple conditions. Contrary to theory, persuasive arguments for PA do not predict SE for PA. Subjective health is more predictive of self-efficacy than objective health or positive affect.

Item Details

Item Type:Conference Extract
Keywords:self-efficacy, health behaviour, older adults
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Behaviour and Health
Author:Schuez, BEC (Dr Benjamin Schuez)
ID Code:78029
Year Published:2010
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2012-06-12
Last Modified:2013-01-11
Downloads:0

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