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Parental smoking in childhood and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in young adults: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study and the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study

Citation

Juonala, M and Magnussen, CG and Venn, A and Gall, S and Kahonen, M and Laitinen, T and Taittonen, L and Lehtimaki, T and Jokinen, E and Sun, C and Viikari, JSA and Dwyer, T and Raitakari, OT, Parental smoking in childhood and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in young adults: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study and the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 32, (4) pp. 1024-1031. ISSN 1079-5642 (2012) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.

DOI: doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.111.243261

Abstract

Objective: Passive smoking has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. The present study aimed to examine the long-term effects of childhood exposure to tobacco smoke on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in adults.

Methods and Results: The analyses were based on 2171 participants in the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns (N = 2067) and Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (N = 104) studies who had measures of conventional risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, adiposity, socioeconomic status) and self-reported parental smoking status when aged 3 to 18 years at baseline. They were re-examined 19 to 27 years later when aged 28 to 45 years. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation was measured at follow-up with ultrasound. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, and childhood risk factors, flow-mediated dilatation was reduced among participants who had parents that smoked in youth compared to those whose parents did not smoke (Young Finns: 9.2 ± 0.1% (mean ± SEM) versus 8.6 ± 0.1%, P = 0.001; Childhood Determinants of Adult Health: 7.4 ± 0.6% versus 4.9 ± 0.9%, P = 0.04). These effects remained after adjustment for adult risk factors including own smoking status (Young Finns, P = 0.003; Childhood Determinants of Adult Health, P = 0.03).

Conclusion: Parental smoking in youth is associated with reduced flow-mediated dilatation in young adulthood measured over 20 years later. These findings suggest that passive exposure to cigarette smoke among children might cause irreversible impairment in endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:endothelial function, epidemiology, children, passive smoking
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
Research Field:Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Cardiovascular System and Diseases
Author:Magnussen, CG (Dr Costan Magnussen)
Author:Venn, A (Professor Alison Venn)
Author:Gall, S (Dr Seana Gall)
ID Code:77478
Year Published:2012
Web of Science® Times Cited:35
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2012-04-18
Last Modified:2015-08-06
Downloads:4 View Download Statistics

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