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The effect of carbohydrate source, inclusion level of gelatinised starch, feed binder and fishmeal particle size on the apparent digestibility of formulated diets for spiny lobster juveniles, Jasus edwardsii

Citation

Simon, CJ, The effect of carbohydrate source, inclusion level of gelatinised starch, feed binder and fishmeal particle size on the apparent digestibility of formulated diets for spiny lobster juveniles, Jasus edwardsii, Aquaculture: An International Journal Devoted to Fundamental Aquatic Food Resources, 296, (3-4) pp. 329-336. ISSN 0044-8486 (2009) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.1016/j.aquaculture.2009.08.032

Abstract

The development of cost-effective and digestible formulated diets is essential for the commercialisation of spiny lobster aquaculture. Large juvenile spiny lobsters, Jasus edwardsii (115 g), were used to measure the apparent digestibility of formulated diets with six different carbohydrate sources, three levels of gelatinised starch, three types of binder, and two ranges of particle size of fishmeal. Carbohydrate source, inclusion level and binder type all had a significant effect on the dry matter digestibility (ranging 61–79%) of formulated diets for J. edwardsii. The digestibility of the carbohydrates included at 35% by dry weight were: dextrin (99%), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC; ~94%), native wheat starch (91%), gelatinised maize starch (84%), native potato (60%) and maize (59%) starches. Gelatinised maize starch inclusion level (ranging from 15% to 55% by dry weight) was negatively correlated with starch digestibility (ranging from 92% to 79% respectively). Dry matter digestibility of the diets was improved by using gelatine (73%) instead of alginate (68%) and agar (61%) as a binder. Nitrogen digestibility (ranging 82–89%) did not differ significantly among diets. Reducing the particle size distribution of the fishmeal from <500 μm to <106 μm did not improve digestibility. The results indicate that using digestible carbohydrate sources (dextrin, CMC, and native wheat starch) for energy, reducing the inclusion level of gelatinised starch, and using CMC or gelatine as binders improve the apparent digestibility of formulated diets. Furthermore, the results also indicate that the use of more soluble and pre-hydrolysed protein sources in diets for J. edwardsii may greatly improve digestibility which is critical in these spiny lobsters where overall food intake is limited.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Carbohydrate Digestibility Starch Nitrogen Carbon Carboxymethyl cellulose
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Aquaculture
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Aquaculture
Objective Field:Aquaculture Crustaceans (excl. Rock Lobster and Prawns)
Author:Simon, CJ (Dr Cedric Simon)
ID Code:77271
Year Published:2009
Web of Science® Times Cited:16
Deposited By:Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration
Deposited On:2012-03-23
Last Modified:2012-04-03
Downloads:1 View Download Statistics

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