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Effectiveness of H1N1/09 monovalent and trivalent influenza vaccines against hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed H1N1/09 influenza in Australia: A test-negative case control study

Citation

Cheng, AC and Kotsimbos, T and Kelly, HA and Irving, LB and Bowler, SD and Brown, SGA and Holmes, M and Jenkins, CR and Thompson, P and Simpson, G and Wood-Baker, R and Senanayake, SN and Brady, SJ and Paterson, DL and Wark, PA and Upham, JW and Korman, TM and Dwyer, DE and Waterer, GW and Kelly, PM, Effectiveness of H1N1/09 monovalent and trivalent influenza vaccines against hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed H1N1/09 influenza in Australia: A test-negative case control study, Vaccine, 29, (43) pp. 7320-7325. ISSN 0264-410X (2011) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.087

Abstract

We aimed to estimate the effectiveness of H1N1/09 containing influenza vaccines against hospitalization from influenza in Australia. We performed a test-negative case control study in patients hospitalized in 15 sentinel Australian hospitals between March and November 2010, comparing influenza vaccination (H1N1/09 monovalent or 2010 seasonal trivalent) in hospitalized patients with PCR-confirmed influenza compared to PCR-negative controls. Between March and November 2010, 1169 hospitalized patients were tested for suspected influenza, of which influenza vaccine status was ascertained in 165/238 patients with H1N1/09 influenza, 40/64 with seasonal influenza and 558/867 test negative controls; 24% of H1N1/09 cases, 43% of seasonal influenza cases and 54% of controls were vaccinated. VE against hospitalisation with H1N1/09 influenza after adjusting for age, medical comorbidities and pregnancy status was estimated at 49% (95% CI: 13%, 70%). Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduction in hospitalisation caused by H1N1/09 influenza in the 2010 southern hemisphere winter season.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Influenza complications; Case control studies; Influenza vaccines
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
Research Field:Respiratory Diseases
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma)
Author:Wood-Baker, R (Professor Richard Wood-Baker)
ID Code:76290
Year Published:2011
Web of Science® Times Cited:35
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2012-03-03
Last Modified:2014-12-17
Downloads:0

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