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Long-Lasting Contralateral Motor Cortex Excitability is Increased by Unilateral Hand Movement That Triggers Electrical Stimulation of Opposite Homologous Muscles

Citation

Schmidt, MW and Hinder, MR and Summers, JJ and Garry, MI, Long-Lasting Contralateral Motor Cortex Excitability is Increased by Unilateral Hand Movement That Triggers Electrical Stimulation of Opposite Homologous Muscles, Neurorehabilitation and Neuro Repair, 25, (6) pp. 521-530. ISSN 1545-9683 (2011) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2011 American Society of Neurorehabilitation

DOI: doi:10.1177/1545968310397202

Abstract

Background/objective. Long-term changes in the motor cortex can be induced by practicing motor tasks with simultaneous application of peripheral nerve stimulation. This combination may augment motor rehabilitation after stroke but has been used primarily during contraction of the affected hand. The authors tested the effect of a right hand movement that electrically stimulated left hand contraction on right motor cortex excitability. Methods. Three tasks were used in 15 healthy subjects—a motor and stimulation task (MStask), stimulation only task (Stask), and motor only task (Mtask). The MStask consisted of isometric thumb abduction of the right hand that triggered paired electrical stimulation of the left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseus (FDI) motor points. The Stask was performed 1 week later and matched the stimulation received in the MStask. The Mtask was performed as a control. Transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the right motor cortex assessed corticospinal excitability, short latency intracortical inhibition, and intracortical facilitation of the FDI and APB before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after task performance. Results. Corticospinal excitability increased in the FDI and APB following the MStask but not following the Stask or Mtask. The increased excitability present 30 minutes after the MStask also correlated with excitability measures recorded 1 week later. Conclusion. A bilateral motor and electrical stimulation task can drive persistent adaptation within the corticospinal system. Hemiplegic subjects who have poor voluntary movement of the affected hand may be able to contract the unaffected hand to activate and train homologous movements.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:motor cortex, plasticity, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), attention
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Author:Schmidt, MW (Mr Matthew Schmidt)
Author:Hinder, MR (Dr Mark Hinder)
Author:Summers, JJ (Professor Jeffery Summers)
Author:Garry, MI (Dr Michael Garry)
ID Code:74840
Year Published:2011
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2011-12-14
Last Modified:2012-06-21
Downloads:0

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