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Explaining the short stature of the poor: chronic childhood disease and growth in nineteenth-century England

Citation

Sharpe, Pamela, Explaining the short stature of the poor: chronic childhood disease and growth in nineteenth-century England, Economic History Review, 65, (4) pp. 1475-1494. ISSN 0013-0117 (2012) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright Economic History Society 2011

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00629.x

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between human growth, final height, and the environment in early nineteenth-century England.While the reasons for stuntedness are multifactoral and involve lack of nourishment and in utero conditions, we should also give emphasis to respiratory, gastro-enteric, and bone disease along with the inadequate and sometimes harmful arrangements for convalescence, involving opiates and inadequate rest. Hard work and prevailing social attitudes slowed recovery and affected limb and organ development.While survival chances may have improved, and indeed were enhanced by measures such as targeted poor relief, quality of life for infants and children remained low and had an influence on their height as adults.The bodies of surviving working-class children showed the burden of hard times.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:History and Archaeology
Research Group:Historical Studies
Research Field:British History
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
Author:Sharpe, Pamela (Professor Pam Sharpe)
ID Code:73451
Year Published:2012
Web of Science® Times Cited:6
Deposited By:History and Classics
Deposited On:2011-10-07
Last Modified:2014-12-12
Downloads:0

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