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Clinical trial: protective effect of a commercial fish protein hydrolysate against indomethacin (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury

Citation

Marchbank, T and Limdi, JK and Mahmood, A and Elia, G and Playford, RJ, Clinical trial: protective effect of a commercial fish protein hydrolysate against indomethacin (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury, Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 28, (6) pp. 799-804. ISSN 0269-2813 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03783.x

Abstract

Background: A partially hydrolysed and dried product of pacific whiting fish is marketed as a health food supplement supporting 'intestinal health'. Aim: To examine whether the partially hydrolysed and dried product of pacific whiting fish influenced the small intestinal damaging side effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Methods: Eight human volunteers completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover protocol of clinically relevant dose of indomethacin (50 mg t.d.s. p.o. for 5 days) with 7 days of fish hydrolysate or placebo starting 2 days prior to indomethacin. Changes in gut permeability were assessed using 5 h urinary lactulose:rhamnose (L/R) ratios. Results: Fish hydrolysate given alone did not affect permeability. In the main study (n = 8), baseline values were similar for both arms (0.28 ± 0.05 and 0.35 ± 0.07). Administration of indomethacin (+placebo) caused a fivefold rise in L/R ratios (increasing to 1.54 ± 0.35), whereas L/R ratios in the same subjects ingesting indomethacin + fish hydrolysate was only 0.59 ± 0.14 (P < 0.01 vs. indomethacin alone). Dyspeptic symptoms occurred in four of eight subjects taking indomethacin alone, but zero of eight when hydrolysate was co-administered. Conclusion: Natural bioactive products (nutriceuticals), such as fish hydrolysates, may provide a novel approach to the prevention and treatment of NSAID-induced and other gastrointestinal injurious conditions. © 2008 The Authors.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Digestive System Disorders
ID Code:72983
Year Published:2008
Web of Science® Times Cited:21
Deposited By:Research Division
Deposited On:2011-09-05
Last Modified:2011-09-05
Downloads:0

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