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Dietary microparticles implicated in Crohn's disease can impair macrophage phagocytic activity and act as adjuvants in the presence of bacterial stimuli

Citation

Butler, M and Boyle, JJ and Powell, JJ and Playford, RJ and Ghosh, S, Dietary microparticles implicated in Crohn's disease can impair macrophage phagocytic activity and act as adjuvants in the presence of bacterial stimuli, Inflammation Research, 56, (9) pp. 353-361. ISSN 1023-3830 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1007/s00011-007-7068-4

Abstract

Objective and design: Western diets regularly expose the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to large quantities ( > 1012/day) of man-made, submicron-sized, particles derived from food additives and excipients. These are taken up by M cells, accumulate in gut macrophages, and may influence the aetiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Materials: We investigated the effects of common dietary microparticles on the function of macrophages from healthy donors or active Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Methods: Macrophages were incubated for 24 h with microparticles before being assayed for cytokine production and phagocytic activity. Results: Microparticles alone were non-stimulatory but, in the presence of bacterial antigens such as LPS, they could act as adjuvants to induce potent cytokine responses. Uptake of high concentrations of microparticles also impaired macrophage phagocytic capacity - but not their ability - to take up 2μM fluorescent beads. Conclusions: While dietary microparticles alone have limited effects on basic macrophage functions, their ability to act as adjuvants could aggravate ongoing inflammatory responses towards bacterial antigens in the GI tract. © 2007 Birkhäuser Verlag.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Digestive System Disorders
Author:Playford, RJ (Professor Ray Playford)
ID Code:72978
Year Published:2007
Web of Science® Times Cited:18
Deposited By:Research Division
Deposited On:2011-09-05
Last Modified:2011-09-05
Downloads:0

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