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Altitudinal divergence in maternal thermoregulatory behaviour may be driven by differences in selection on offspring survival in a viviparous lizard

Citation

Uller, T and While, GM and Cadby, CD and Harts, A and O'Connor, K and Pen, P and Wapstra, E, Altitudinal divergence in maternal thermoregulatory behaviour may be driven by differences in selection on offspring survival in a viviparous lizard, Evolution, 65, (8) pp. 2313-2324. ISSN 0014-3820 (2011) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution. The definitive published version is available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01303.x

Abstract

Plastic responses to temperature during embryonic development are common in ectotherms, but their evolutionary relevance is poorly understood. Using a combination of field and laboratory approaches, we demonstrate altitudinal divergence in the strength of effects of maternal thermal opportunity on offspring birth date and body mass in a live-bearing lizard (Niveoscincus ocellatus). Poor thermal opportunity decreased birth weight at low altitudes where selection on body mass was negligible. In contrast, there was no effect of maternal thermal opportunity on body mass at high altitudes where natural selection favored heavy offspring. The weaker effect of poor maternal thermal opportunity on offspring development at high altitude was accompanied by a more active thermoregulation and higher body temperature in highland females. This may suggest that passive effects of temperature on embryonic development have resulted in evolution of adaptive behavioral compensation for poor thermal opportunity at high altitudes, but that direct effects of maternal thermal environment are maintained at low altitudes because they are not selected against. More generally, we suggest that phenotypic effects of maternal thermal opportunity or incubation temperature in reptiles will most commonly reflect weak selection for canalization or selection on maternal strategies rather than adaptive plasticity to match postnatal environments.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Evolutionary Biology
Research Field:Biological Adaptation
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Author:Uller, T (Dr Tobias Uller)
Author:While, GM (Dr Geoff While)
Author:Cadby, CD (Dr Chloe Cadby-Bibari)
Author:O'Connor, K (Miss Katherine O'Connor)
Author:Wapstra, E (Associate Professor Erik Wapstra)
ID Code:72173
Year Published:2011
Web of Science® Times Cited:20
Deposited By:Zoology
Deposited On:2011-08-23
Last Modified:2017-10-31
Downloads:0

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