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Disorder specificity despite comorbidity: Resting EEG alpha asymmetry in major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder

Citation

Kemp, AH and Griffiths, K and Felmingham, KL and Shankman, SA and Drinkenburg, W and Arns, M and Clark, CR and Bryant, RA, Disorder specificity despite comorbidity: Resting EEG alpha asymmetry in major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, Biological Psychology, 2010, (85) pp. 350-354. ISSN 0301-0511 (2010) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. The definitive version is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.08.001

Abstract

The approach-withdrawal and valence-arousal models highlight that specific brain laterality profiles may distinguish depression and anxiety. However, studies remain to be conducted in multiple clinical populations that directly test the diagnostic specificity of these hypotheses. The current study compared electroencephalographic data under resting state, eyes closed conditions in patients with major depressive disorder(MDD)(N= 15) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (N= 14) relative to healthy controls (N= 15) to examine the specificity of brain laterality in these disorders. Key findings included (1) reduced left-frontal activity in MDD, (2) a positive correlation between PTSD severity and right-frontal lateralisation, (3) greater activity in PTSD patients relative to MDD within the right-parietotemporal region, and (4) globally increased alpha power in MDD. Findings partially support the diagnostic applicability of the theoretical frameworks. Future studies may benefit from examining task-driven differences between groups.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Depression, MDD, Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, Electroencephalography, EEG, Alpha asymmetry, Resting state, BRAINnet, Brain Resuorce International Database
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
Author:Felmingham, KL (Professor Kim Felmingham)
ID Code:71905
Year Published:2010
Web of Science® Times Cited:55
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2011-08-12
Last Modified:2014-11-27
Downloads:7 View Download Statistics

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