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Decline of Callitris intratropica R. T. Baker & H. G. Smith in the Northern Territory: Implications for pre- and post-European colonization fire regimes

Citation

Bowman, DMJS and Panton, WJ, Decline of Callitris intratropica R. T. Baker & H. G. Smith in the Northern Territory: Implications for pre- and post-European colonization fire regimes, Journal of Biogeography, 20, (4) pp. 373-381. ISSN 0305-0270 (1993) [Refereed Article]


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The definitive published version is available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/

DOI: doi:10.2307/2845586

Abstract

Callitris intratropica R. T. Baker & H. G. Smith occurs in a range of environments throughout the lower latitudes of the Northern Territory. A geographic survey of the demographic structure of stands revealed a continuum ranging for populations which have a majority of dead individuals, a lack of regeneration and fire-scarred living adults, to stands with few dead or damaged individuals and a heaqvy stocking of juveniles. A TWINSPAN classification divided this continuum into four groups. There were no significant differences between the cover of rocks, grass or shrubs between the four groups of stands, nor was there a significant association with substrate type. Damaged stands were most common and occurred throughout the species' range, while the healthier stands were more typical on coastal sites with >30% tree canopy cover. Stands with dense regeneration were significantly associated with an area actively protected from fire by a forestry operation. A helicopter survey on parts of the remote and currently uninhabited Arnhem Land Plateau revealed a significantly greater count of dead stems than counts of living C. intratropica trees. Detailed studies at one site on the Arnhem Land Plateau showed that there is currently a high mortality of tagged stems, and that the abundant C. intratropica stags died since the 1940s. It is argued that the widespreadt crash of C. intratropica populations is a response to a change in fire regime associated with the coming of Europeans.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Forestry Sciences
Research Field:Forestry Sciences not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Author:Bowman, DMJS (Professor David Bowman)
ID Code:69140
Year Published:1993
Web of Science® Times Cited:120
Deposited By:Plant Science
Deposited On:2011-04-19
Last Modified:2011-07-27
Downloads:3 View Download Statistics

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