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Protein synthesis, degradation, and retention: mechanisms of indeterminate growth in cephalopods

Citation

Moltschaniwskyj, NA and Carter, CG, Protein synthesis, degradation, and retention: mechanisms of indeterminate growth in cephalopods, Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 83, (6) pp. 997-1008. ISSN 1522-2152 (2010) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright © 2010 University of Chicago Press

Official URL: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/index.html

DOI: doi:10.1086/656387

Abstract

This study is the first to examine the underlying process of growth in a cephalopod, the southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica), to ascertain the mechanism by which indeterminate growth is achieved in this live-fast, die-young group of animals. This is the first study to estimate rates of protein synthesis and growth of squid from 7 to 140 d of age, providing an understanding of both the pattern and the process of growth throughout the lifetime of a squid species. Younger and smaller individuals had greater rates of protein synthesis and protein synthesis retention efficiency, as well as more RNA, than did older and larger individuals. Variation in growth rates among older, larger individuals was a function of individuals with faster growth rates having greater protein synthesis retention efficiency and also greater concentrations of protein. Critically, growth did not cease in the adults and, with an average of 10% of protein synthesized being retained, the mechanism to support the nonasymptotic growth model of cephalopods is provided.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Fisheries Sciences
Research Field:Aquaculture
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Fisheries - Aquaculture
Objective Field:Fisheries - Aquaculture not elsewhere classified
Author:Moltschaniwskyj, NA (Associate Professor Natalie Moltschaniwskyj)
Author:Carter, CG (Professor Chris Carter)
ID Code:66705
Year Published:2010
Web of Science® Times Cited:10
Deposited By:TAFI - Marine Research Laboratory
Deposited On:2011-02-09
Last Modified:2011-03-22
Downloads:508 View Download Statistics

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