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Effect of compliance with nicotine gum dosing on weight gained during a quit attempt

Citation

Ferguson, SG and Shiffman, S and Rohay, JM and Gitchell, JG and Garvey, AJ, Effect of compliance with nicotine gum dosing on weight gained during a quit attempt, Addiction, 106, (3) pp. 651-656. ISSN 0965-2140 (2011) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

The definitive published version is available online at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/

Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03244.x

Abstract

Aim Using nicotine gum can reduce the amount of weight gained when quitting. Here we examine the relationship between weight gain and use of adequate amounts of gum. To mitigate the confounders associated with correlational analyses, we contrast the effects of active gum and placebo, and analyze outcomes prospectively. Design and setting Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of nicotine gum. Participants were instructed to use nine to 15 pieces of gum/day for the first 2 months of treatment. Participants Participants (n = 103) were randomized to either active (2 mg or 4 mg) or placebo gum. Measurements We examined the effect on weight gain of the interaction between treatment (active versus placebo) and daily gum use [¡İ9 pieces/day (compliant use) versus < 9 pieces/day]. Findings After 30 days of abstinence, smokers treated with active gum had not gained significantly less weight than those on placebo (1.1 kg versus 1.6 kg, P = 0.175). However, a significant compliance¨Ctreatment interaction was observed (P = 0.005): active gum users who used ¡İ9 pieces/day during the first 14 days of treatment had gained less weight at follow-up (0.6 kg versus 1.6 kg for those who used <9 pieces/day, P = 0.017), but participants randomized to the placebo group saw no such benefit from compliant use. A similar compliance¨Ctreatment interaction (P = 0.046) was also observed when the effect of compliance was examined within active treatment (2 mg versus 4 mg). Conclusions When smokers are quitting, those who use more pieces of nicotine gum experience less weight gain in the first 30 days. This relationship is not seen for smokers on placebo gum.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:nicotine, gum, weight, dosing, quit, attempt, compliance
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research Field:Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Preventive Medicine
Author:Ferguson, SG (Associate Professor Stuart Ferguson)
ID Code:65749
Year Published:2011
Web of Science® Times Cited:4
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2010-12-01
Last Modified:2017-11-02
Downloads:0

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