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Provisioning in flesh-footed shearwaters (Puffinus Carneipes): Plastic foraging behaviour and the implications for increased fishery interactions

Citation

Thalmann, SJ and Lea, MA and Hindell, M and Priddel, D and Carlile, N, Provisioning in flesh-footed shearwaters (Puffinus Carneipes): Plastic foraging behaviour and the implications for increased fishery interactions, The Auk, 127, (1) pp. 140-150. ISSN 0004-8038 (2010) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright © 2010 American Ornithologistsí Union

Official URL: http://www.ucpressjournals.com

DOI: doi:10.1525/auk.2009.09158

Abstract

Offspring provisioning constrains the foraging behavior of breeding seabirds temporally and spatially. In species whoseforaging grounds overlap with commercial fisheries, quantifying the provisioning behavior of breeding adults throughout the season can illuminate the nature of interactions with the fisheries and, where seabird bycatch exists, contribute to development of mitigation measures. In 2004 - 2005, we studied the provisioning behavior of Flesh-footed Shearwaters (Puffinus carneipes) on Lord Howe Island, Australia, using the repeated-weighing technique. Specifically, we determined (1) meal size, feeding frequency, and chick growth rates; (2) attendance behavior of adults; and (3) estimated food consumption at the individual and colony levels. Incubation shift duration averaged 9.5+-1.6 (SD) days. Foraging-trip duration was bimodal, with both short trips (<-3 days) and long trips (>3 days) recorded. Average meal mass was greater during the late chick-rearing period and was not influenced by the time interval between meals. Developing chicks had a food conversion efficiency of 27%, with a total individual food requirement of 2,337 g to fledge successfully. An increase in the interval between provisioning events from the early to the late chick-rearing period was associated with significantly more long foraging trips by parent birds; however, there was no variation in the proportion of study birds that returned each night

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Behavioural Ecology
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Ecosystem Assessment and Management
Objective Field:Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments
Author:Thalmann, SJ (Mr Samuel Thalmann)
Author:Lea, MA (Associate Professor Mary-Anne Lea)
Author:Hindell, M (Professor Mark Hindell)
ID Code:63745
Year Published:2010
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Zoology
Deposited On:2010-05-26
Last Modified:2014-11-24
Downloads:0

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