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Neonatal exposure to UV-B radiation leads to a large reduction in Langerhans cell density, but by maturity, there is an enhanced ability of dendritic cells to stimulate T cells

Citation

McGee, HM and Scott, DK and Woods, GM, Neonatal exposure to UV-B radiation leads to a large reduction in Langerhans cell density, but by maturity, there is an enhanced ability of dendritic cells to stimulate T cells, Immunology and Cell Biology, 84, (3) pp. 259-266. ISSN 0818-9641 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1440-1711.2006.01429.x

Abstract

Australia has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world and ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation has been implicated as its major aetiological agent. Despite the link between melanoma and exposure to UV-B radiation in childhood, little work has been carried out to determine the effects of UV-B on neonatal skin. In this study, we investigated the response of adult and neonatal Langerhans cells (LC) to UV-B radiation to determine whether exposure in the neonatal period impairs the development of the skin immune system, thus having implications for the immune response later in life. Neonatal and adult mice were irradiated with a single dose of UV-B radiation and epidermal sheets prepared to determine the number of LC present. In addition, antigen carriage and T-cell proliferation assays were carried out to assess the immune response when the mice reached maturity. Results showed that neonatal LC were more susceptible than adult LC to depletion at 2 kJ/m2 UV-B exposure; however, there was similar susceptibility at lower doses. When mice that were irradiated as neonates were analysed at maturity, there was an increased ability to respond to cutaneously applied antigen as more antigen was transported to the lymph node and the lymph node dendritic cells had an enhanced ability to stimulate T-cell proliferation. In addition, this response was skewed towards a Th2 type response. Thus, single high-dose UV-B exposure alters the development of neonatal LC, resulting in a short-term reduction in the number of LC but an enhanced immune response when assessed at maturity.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Immunology
Research Field:Cellular Immunology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Cancer and Related Disorders
Author:McGee, HM (Dr Heather McGee)
Author:Scott, DK (Ms Deborah Scott)
Author:Woods, GM (Professor Gregory Woods)
ID Code:63361
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:8
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2010-04-30
Last Modified:2010-05-04
Downloads:0

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