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Glycosylation of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase changes as a function of the duration of Alzheimer's disease

Citation

Saez-Valero, J and Fodero, LR and Sjogren, M and Andreasen, N and Amici, S and Gallai, V and Vanderstichele, H and Vanmechelen, E and Parnetti, L and Blennow, K and Small, DH, Glycosylation of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase changes as a function of the duration of Alzheimer's disease, Journal of Neuroscience Research, 72, (4) pp. 520-526. ISSN 0360-4012 (2003) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1002/jnr.10599

Abstract

The identification of biochemical markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may help in the diagnosis of the disease. Previous studies have shown that A1-42 is decreased, and tau and phospho-tau are increased in AD cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Our own studies have identified glycosylated isoforms of acetylcholinesterase (Glyc-AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (Glyc-BuChE) that are increased in AD CSF. Glyc-AChE is increased in APP (SW) Tg2576 transgenic mice prior to amyloid plaque deposition, which suggests that Glyc-AChE may be an early marker of AD. The aim of this study was to determine whether Glyc-AChE or Glyc-BuChE is increased in CSF at early stages of AD and to compare the levels of these markers with those of A142, tau and phospho-tau. Lumbar CSF was obtained ante mortem from 106 non-AD patients, including 15 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 102 patients with probable AD. Glyc-AChE, tau and phospho-tau were significantly increased in the CSF of AD patients compared to nonneurological disease (NND) controls. A1-42 was lower in the AD patients than in NND controls. A positive correlation was found between the levels of Glyc-AChE or Glyc-BuChE and disease duration. However, there was no clear correlation between the levels of tau, phosphotau or A1-42 and disease duration. The results suggest that Glyc-AChE and Glyc-BuChE are unlikely to be early markers of AD, although they may have value as markers of disease progression.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing
Author:Small, DH (Professor David Small)
ID Code:63307
Year Published:2003
Web of Science® Times Cited:43
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2010-04-28
Last Modified:2010-09-16
Downloads:0

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