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Efficacy of sulfasalazine in patients with inflammatory back pain due to undifferentiated spondyloarthritis and early ankylosing spondylitis: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

Citation

Braun, J and Zochling, JM and Baraliakos, X and Alten, R and Burmester, G and Grasedyck, K and Brandt, J and Haibel, H and Hammer, M and Krause, A and Mielke, F and Tony, H and Ebner, W and Gomor, B and Hermann, J and Zeidler, H and Beck, E and Baumgaetner, M and Sieper, J, Efficacy of sulfasalazine in patients with inflammatory back pain due to undifferentiated spondyloarthritis and early ankylosing spondylitis: a multicentre randomised controlled trial, Annals of The Rheumatic Diseases: The Eular Journal, 65, (9) pp. 1147-1153. ISSN 0003-4967 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1136/ard.2006.052878

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the effect of sulfasalazine (SSZ) on inflammatory back pain (IBP) due to active undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (uSpA) or ankylosing spondylitis in patients with symptom duration <5 years. Methods: Patients with IBP and a Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) >3 from 12 centres were randomly assigned to 24 weeks' treatment with SSZ 2 g/day or placebo. The primary outcome variable was the change in BASDAI over 6 months. Secondary outcomes included measures of spinal pain, physical function and inflammation. Results: 230 patients (50% men, age range 18-64 years, 67% human leucocyte antigen B27 positive) were treated with either SSZ 21 g/day or placebo for 6 months. Enthesitis was found in 50%, and peripheral arthritis in 47% of the patients. The mean (SD) BASDAI dropped markedly in both groups: by 3.7 (2.7) and 3.8 (2.4), respectively, as did most secondary outcome measures. No noticeable difference in treatment was observed between groups. Patients with IBP and no peripheral arthritis had significantly (p = 0.03) more benefit with SSZ (BASDAI 5.1 (1.3) to 2.8 (2.3)) than with placebo (5.2 (1.6) to 3.8 (2.4)). Spinal pain (p = 0.03) and morning stiffness (p = 0.05) improved with SSZ in these patients, but other secondary outcomes were not markedly different. Conclusion: SSZ was no better than placebo for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of uSpA; however, SSZ was more effective than placebo in the subgroup of patients with IBP and no peripheral arthritis.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Rheumatology and Arthritis
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
Author:Zochling, JM (Dr Jane Zochling)
ID Code:62666
Year Published:2006
Web of Science® Times Cited:74
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2010-03-16
Last Modified:2011-07-13
Downloads:0

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