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Attention and working memory of deficits in mild cognitive impairment

Citation

Saunders, N and Summers, MJ, Attention and working memory of deficits in mild cognitive impairment, Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition. Section A: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 32, (4) pp. 350-357. ISSN 1380-3395 (2010) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

The definitive published version is available online at: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals

DOI: doi:10.1080/13803390903042379

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has emerged as a classification for a prodromal phase of cognitive decline preceding the emergence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined neuropsychological functioning in a sample of 60 adults with amnestic-MCI (a-MCI), 32 with subjective complaints of memory impairment (subjective-MCI, s-MCI), 14 with mild AD, and 25 age-matched controls. Both the a-MCI and s-MCI groups displayed impaired attentional processing, working memory capacity, and semantic language, with a-MCI displaying additional impairments to verbal and/or visual memory. These results indicate that further research is needed to examine cognitive decline in nonamnestic variants of MCI.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Mild cognitive impairment; Memory; Executive function; Attention; Working memory
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing
Author:Saunders, N (Dr Nichole Saunders)
Author:Summers, MJ (Dr Mathew Summers)
ID Code:60848
Year Published:2010
Web of Science® Times Cited:55
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2010-02-19
Last Modified:2014-12-18
Downloads:61 View Download Statistics

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