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Modeling the Lag Phase and Growth Rate of Listeria monocytogenes in Ground Ham Containing Sodium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate at Various Storage Temperatures

Citation

Hwang, CA and Tamplin, ML, Modeling the Lag Phase and Growth Rate of Listeria monocytogenes in Ground Ham Containing Sodium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate at Various Storage Temperatures, Journal of Food Science, 72, (7) pp. M246-M253. ISSN 0022-1147 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00443.x

Abstract

Refrigerated ready-to-eat (RTE) meats contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes were implicated in several listeriosis outbreaks. Lactate and diacetate have been shown to control L. monocytogenes in RTE meats. The objective of this study was to examine and model the effect of lactate (1.0% to 4.2%) and diacetate (0.05% to 0.2%) in ground ham on the lag phase duration (LPD, h) and growth rate (GR, log CFU/h) of L. monocytogenes at a range of temperatures (0 to 45 °C). A 6-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was inoculated into ground ham containing lactate and diacetate, and stored at various temperatures. The LPD and GR of L. monocytogenes in ham as affected by lactate, diacetate, and storage temperature were analyzed and accurately represented with mathematical equations. Resulting LPD and GR equations for storage temperatures within the range of 0 to 36 °C significantly represented the experimental data with a regression coefficient of 0.97 and 0.96, respectively. Significant factors (P < 0.05) that affected the LPD were temperature, lactate, diacetate, and the interactions of all three, whereas only temperature and the interactions between temperature and lactate and diacetate had a significant effect on GR. At suboptimal growth temperatures (≤12 °C) the increase of lactate and diacetate concentrations, individually or in combination, extended the LPD. The effect of higher concentrations of both additives on reducing the GR was observed only at temperatures that were more suitable for growth of L. monocytogenes, that is, 15 to 35 °C. These data may be used to assist in determining concentrations of lactate and diacetate in cooked ham products to control the growth of L. monocytogenes over a wide range of temperatures during manufacturing, distribution, and storage. © 2007 Institute of Food Technologists.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Microbiology
Research Field:Infectious Agents
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Food Safety
UTAS Author:Tamplin, ML (Professor Mark Tamplin)
ID Code:53369
Year Published:2007
Web of Science® Times Cited:13
Deposited By:Agricultural Science
Deposited On:2008-12-03
Last Modified:2011-11-07
Downloads:0

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