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Supersize Me: Does Anthropogenic Food Change the Body Condition of Silver Gulls? A Comparison Between Urbanized and Remote, Non-urbanized Areas

Citation

Auman, HJ and Meathrel, CE and Richardson, AMM, Supersize Me: Does Anthropogenic Food Change the Body Condition of Silver Gulls? A Comparison Between Urbanized and Remote, Non-urbanized Areas, Waterbirds: the international journal of waterbird ecology, 31, (1) pp. 122-126. ISSN 1524-4695 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1675/1524-4695(2008)31[122:SMDAFC]2.0.CO;2

Abstract

Urban populations of several gull species worldwide are increasing dramatically and this is often assumed to be a result of greater access to anthropogenic food obtained in urbanized environments. This research investigated the potential effects of an anthropogenic diet on the mass and body condition of Silver Gulls (Larus novaehollandiae) by comparing birds at a remote, non-urbanized site (Furneaux Island Group) with those at an urbanized (Hobart) site in Tasmania, Australia. The mass, size and body condition of gulls were independent of whether or not a bird was breeding, and independent of the stage in the breeding cycle. Male gulls from this urban environment were heavier and of greater body condition than the structurally identical, non-urban gulls, but no differences were detected between females.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Zoology
Research Field:Zoology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Urban and Industrial Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
UTAS Author:Auman, HJ (Dr Heidi Auman)
UTAS Author:Richardson, AMM (Associate Professor Alastair Richardson)
ID Code:52301
Year Published:2008
Web of Science® Times Cited:39
Deposited By:Zoology
Deposited On:2008-06-17
Last Modified:2009-05-11
Downloads:0

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