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Parental smoking and smoking experimentation in childhood increase the risk of being a smoker 20 years later. The childhood determinants of adult health study

Citation

Paul, SL and Blizzard, CL and Patton, GC and Dwyer, T and Venn, A, Parental smoking and smoking experimentation in childhood increase the risk of being a smoker 20 years later. The childhood determinants of adult health study, Addiction, 103, (5) pp. 846-853. ISSN 0965-2140 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02196.x

Abstract

Aims: To examine the long-term effects of childhood smoking experimentation and exposure to parental smoking on adult smoking risk. Methods: Data were from a 20-year follow-up of 9-15-year-olds who completed questionnaires in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey (n = 6559). The relative risks (RR) of adult current smoking in 2004-05 for childhood exposure to smoking experimentation (never, a few puffs, < 10 cigarettes, >10 cigarettes) and parental smoking (none, father, mother, both parents) in 1985, with adjustment for confounders, were estimated by log binomial modelling. Analyses were stratified by age (9-13 and 14-15 years) and sex. Findings: Participation at follow-up was 54% (n = 3559). Childhood smoking experimentation increased the risk of being a current smoker particularly for 14-15-year-old experimenters of more than 10 cigarettes [males, RR 2.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.25; females, RR 6.39, 95% CI 2.85-14.33]. Parental smoking was associated with adult current smoking risk, particularly for 9-13-year-olds with two smoking parents (males, RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.19-1.96; females, RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.52-2.61) and older males with smoking mothers (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.22-2.73). Parental smoking was not associated with childhood smoking experimentation. Conclusions: These findings suggest that any childhood smoking experimentation increases the risk of being a smoker 20 years later. As exposure to parental smoking predicted current smoking, parents should be aware of the association between their own smoking behaviour and that of their children. © 2008 The Authors.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Epidemiology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Preventive Medicine
UTAS Author:Paul, SL (Associate Professor Seana Gall)
UTAS Author:Blizzard, CL (Professor Leigh Blizzard)
UTAS Author:Dwyer, T (Professor Terry Dwyer)
UTAS Author:Venn, A (Professor Alison Venn)
ID Code:52103
Year Published:2008
Funding Support:National Health and Medical Research Council (435712)
Web of Science® Times Cited:34
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2008-05-30
Last Modified:2009-05-28
Downloads:0

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